To Mount or Mat Fine Art?

Great photographic fine art printing deserve to be prominently displayed. There are a variety of ways for displaying pictures – mounting or matting, for instance, either of which utilizes unique materials and have varying final outcomes. The optimum choice for each artwork or photo greatly depends on how significant they are, how they are printed and what’s the desired display preference. Knowing the various methods and their advantages and disadvantages will help you in determining what options you must take on how to prepare your work for display.

Knowing what’s mounting and matting will give you an idea on how to properly put emphasis on the print for display. Mounting or matting a printed works will aid the viewer in considering the image as more than an object and as an important artwork.

Mounting

To safeguard your image against bending or creasing, to get it ready for framing or to maintain its firmness while it’s hanging on the wall, it is important to have your image mounted on a strong backing. Mounting refers to sticking a print into a backboard. Mounting has three main methods: First, fully adhered the print to the board with the use of the dry-mount process. Second, the print is retained on the board using photo corners. And lastly, the print is adhered in place at points using hinge-mounts. If you opt to mount the image into a backboard without a window mat, then it’s vital that the image is attached in a manner that the adhesive is not visible like the folded hinges or dry-mount tissue.

Matting

Matting is commonly used on works that are done on paper, like prints, drawings, and watercolor paintings. Mats are visible all over the edges of an artwork and come in various colors and materials. Oftentimes, double-matting is used to help emphasize the colors in an artwork; one of the layers may have a neutral color and the other layer has a tint that’s in the art.
For images covered with glass and added matting layer may be recommended to offer more separation between the glass and the artwork. Paper tends to swell in higher humidity and if it makes contact with the glass it may stick to it, which may result in perpetually harming the image.

Mats have three different types. Decorative mats are the least costly and are made from wood pulp that has been reduced to a neutral pH, which means that as it fails it will not leak acids that could harm the artwork. The most used and popular mats are made from lignin-free and acid-neutralized wood pulp which are expensive but can last longer.

Be sure to contact Luminious Print for all your fine art printing in Vancouver needs.

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